The Dynamic Mosaic of Space-Time Intensity and the Natural Quantum Rhythm of Form in Consciousness: Jim Morrison’s and Charles Baudelaire’s Quest for ‘Death’s Twilight Kingdom’

The Dynamic Mosaic of Space-Time Intensity and the Natural Quantum Rhythm of Form in Consciousness: Jim Morrison’s and Charles Baudelaire’s Quest for ‘Death’s Twilight Kingdom’ 

“Time present and time past 

Are both perhaps present in time future 

And time future contained in time past.

If all time is eternally present 

All time is unredeemable”. – Burnt Norton (Four Quartets), T. S. Eliot, 1935

‘Death’s Twilight Kingdom’/The Hollow Men (1925), T. S. Eliot

Jim Morrison, Monalisa, 2013

Jim Morrison, Monalisa, 2013

Jim Morrison, Monalisa, 2013

Consciousness-Analogue

Poetry is the fractal wheel of fire

Oh friend of the dark star

The monster of light has fed its wrath on the weeping clouds of fortune

To hell the heaven endorse another view

The practical man ashamed of his luck falls on the floor

His month ticks like years pouring dust on empty canals

Light crossed her eyes

Like rainbow in the skies

Soft moist petals over Parnassian waves

Floating like time in eternal caves

There sun has hidden her face behind the mirror

Behind the mirror, behind the black pool of mirror where the spider climbs

Behind the shadow, knowledge claims false apparitions

That was all history confined in that point of prison

Together we ride that wave …fade away

Far…

Come again…

White like the tiger’s brown bosom of the sea

Beneath the tree, in the split of shelter

In the silence of another way

Charles Baudelaire, Monalisa, 2013

Charles Baudelaire, Monalisa, 2013

Come again my friend

Not to lose but to determine

In the hairs of grazing horses

The unforgettable rhythm of the ancient song

How the ordinary is transfigured into intangible sublime

There after the recession where we must all go…

Come again…

Joy Roy Choudhury

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1 Comment

  1. tuli

     /  April 11, 2013

    Jim Morrison has come alive in the painting, Monalisa.
    The soul piercing gaze of Charles Baudelaire is intense.

    Reply

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